Getting Through Customs on Dominica

Travelers have spending allowances and importation limits when traveling


Dominica Customs
 

Customs and border protection services limit the types and quantities of goods that travelers may introduce to the country. Visitors traveling to or returning from Dominica will be able to import limited quantities of alcohol and tobacco.

Dominica Customs

Travelers who visit Dominica may have to undergo routine customs inspections upon entering the country. Dominica limits the amount of tobacco and alcohol that can be imported, though many travelers are unlikely to have a need to import large quantities of these goods. Generally, customs regulations in the Caribbean allow travelers to bring in quantities that will be suitable for personal use during a vacation. Customs allowances for Dominica are:

  • 200 cigarettes;

  • 50 cigars;

  • 40 ounces of liquor or wine;

  • Personal and household effects.

Maps

Visitors who plan on bringing a pet into the country should contact Dominica's Veterinary Officer at 767-448-2401 (x3427). Contact should be made months in advance in order to secure paperwork and permits. Boaters entering Dominica with firearms will need to declare these weapons to customs officials upon checking in. There are generally restrictions upon bringing foreign plant and animal specimens into the country. Local embassies or consular agents may be able to supply further information on customs regulations.

United States Customs

Although Dominica is not a popular shopping destination in the Caribbean, travelers may still wish to purchase local goods, designer clothing, crafts, and Caribbean rum while in the country. Vacationers returning to the United States from Dominica have an $800(USD) spending allowance as long as they have been out of the country more than 48 hours. It is important for travelers to keep all sales receipts to be able to show them to customs officers upon returning to the United States. Packages sent to the United States from Caribbean Basin countries can have $800(USD) worth of goods. Visitors who have traveled abroad more than once in the past month or who have been out of the United States for less than 48 hours have a $200(USD) spending allowance. The United States also has limits on the amounts and types of goods that can be imported into the country. The following goods can be imported duty-free within the $800(USD) spending allowance.

  • 200 cigarette;

  • 100 cigars (non Cuban);

  • 2 liters of alcohol (one liter must be produced locally in a Caribbean Basin country.

Travelers who have spent less than 48 hours out of the United States can bring up to 50 cigarettes, 10 cigars, and 150 milliliters of liquor within their $200(USD) spending allowance. Fine art may be imported duty-free.

In addition to limiting the amount of goods that travelers can import into the United States, the United States Customs and Border Protection service (https://www.cbp.gov/) is responsible for preventing the introduction of dangerous and hazardous materials, animals, insects, and people into the country. Items such as foreign soils, plants, meats, vegetables, fruits, insects, marine life, and animals can be harmful if brought to places where they do not belong.

Customs Contacts

Country Contact Information
United States U.S. Customs Service
1300 Pennsylvania Ave., NW
Washington, DC 20229
877-287-8867
http://www.customs.gov
United Kingdom HM Customs & Excise
0845-010-9000
http://www.hmce.gov.uk
Canada Canada Border Services Agency
800-461-9999
http://www.cbsa-asfc.gc.ca/menu-eng.html
France Embassy of France in the United States
4101 Reservoir Road, NW
Washington, DC 20007
202-944-6375
http://ambafrance-us.org/spip.php?rubrique=2
Netherlands Royal Netherlands Embassy in the United States
4200 Linnean Avenue NW
Washington, DC 20008
202-244-5300
http://www.netherlands-embassy.org/homepage.asp
Australia Australian Customs Service
1-300-363-263
http://www.customs.gov.au
New Zealand New Zealand Customs Service
04-473-6099
http://www.customs.govt.nz

Customs officials exist to protect the best interests of a country by monitoring and limiting the goods that are imported. Travelers should keep sales receipts easily accessible and avoid brining restricted items back to the country to dodge slowdowns when going through customs.

 

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